Mania and Depression

Mania and Depression are a collection of orphan songs from 2008. One album does not necessarily represent mania, or the other one depression, but I did arrange the songs in accordance to where they fit best, as far as mania and depression. “Good Omens” was the first song that I wrote in 2008 and it is a song that prophecies a good year – I don’t remember 2008 too well, but it certainly was not a bad year. “God” is not a religious song by any means, and I’ve always thought of it as “the single” to this collection – which is not to say that it is the best song of the collection. “Hip Cats from the School of Post-Post-Modernism” is a nod to my fellows from UTEP’s creative writing-scape. (A very special nod to my noble beat-priest, David Scheier.) “Jump Across the Golden Ocean” is, in some respects, a kowtow to Koji Kondo, that magical composer from the Legend of Zelda video games – really, all of my music is in debt to him, among some other fine musicians and muses. There are a couple of songs on here written for beagles, not humans, and only beagles will understand. Other electronic musicians might notice that this was the year when I discovered the arpeggiator, what it does, how it works, and the consequences of its addictive qualities.

tchem scholars might recall the song “Broken Chandelier” from 2009’s Little Fi. Here is the song in its original and short form… I wrote “Fever” during the darkest time of my life, when under the boot of a local epidemic’s variation on the stomach flu, which gave me delusions at bedtime and had me vomiting chicken mole into the toilet for some nights. “Your Wife on the Television” is a reference to Fox’s horrific game show, The Moment of Truth, where the operation of the game was to dissolve your marriage by admitting to having an affair in front of a national audience, and then you would win money for your divorce. The Interzone in “Interzone Lullaby” is none other than Bill Burroughs’ nightmarish place from Naked Lunch, which I had painfully read before writing the song. “You Might Get Married” is a tune for you to whistle when you feel lonely, so that you may feel even more lonely, because it is not about you getting married, but about that person that you want to marry getting married to somebody else… and that is the most honest depression out of all the depressions.

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